Assumptions research and please include references in APA format 7th ed,

SCHOOL OF COUNSELING AND HUMAN SERVICES

DOCTORAL PROJECT PLAN

STATEMENT OF ORIGINAL WORK

 

I understand that Capella University’s Academic Honesty Policy (3.01.01) holds learners accountable for the integrity of work they submit, which includes, but is not limited to, discussion postings, assignments, comprehensive exams, and the Capstone. Learners are expected to understand the policy and know that it is their responsibility to learn about instructor and general academic expectations with regard to proper citation of sources in written work as specified in the APA Publication Manual, 6th Ed. Serious sanctions can result from violations of any type of the Academic Honesty Policy, including dismissal from the university.

 

I attest that this document represents my own work. Where I have used the ideas of others, I have paraphrased and given credit according to the guidelines of the APA Publication Manual, 6th Ed. Where I have used the words of others (i.e., direct quotes), I have followed the guidelines for using direct quotes prescribed by the APA Publication Manual, 6th Ed.

 

I have read, understood, and abided by Capella University’s Academic Honesty Policy (3.01.01). I further understand that Capella University takes plagiarism seriously; regardless of intention, the result is the same.

 

 

Signature for Statement of Original Work (MUST COMPLETE)

Learner Name

 

Krystal Rozier

Mentor Name
 

 

Learner Email

 

Mztweety24@aol.com

Mentor Email  

 

Learner ID

2372205

 

Date 03/13/2022

 

 

Capstone Project Plan Process

You will use this form to successfully complete your keystone class, obtaining Milestone 1, and obtaining Milestone 2 approval.  The goals of this process are: (1) facilitate the planning of the details of your doctoral research project, (2) allow for scientific merit review, and (3) facilitate your progress through the Capstone. You must obtain approval of your Doctoral Project Plan before seeking IRB approval, collecting data, and writing your Capstone manuscript. Approval of your Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) will satisfy the Capstone Milestone 2, indicating that the Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) has passed the scientific merit review part of the IRB process.

 

The scientific merit process is designed to ensure that a proposed research study contains an appropriate level of scientific rigor and merit prior to ethical review.  Rigor is achieved if the study is well-designed and has adequate resources so that participants are not exposed to unnecessary harms.  Merit is achieved if the rights and welfare of the human research participants are protected

 

 

**Obtaining Scientific Merit approval for the  Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) does not guarantee you will obtain IRB approval. A detailed ethical review will be conducted during the process of IRB approval.

 

How to Use This Form

 

This Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) form is intended to help you plan the details of your Capstone Project.  It provides a space for you to work out all the details of your design. Once you have obtained Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) approval, you should be able to easily expand on the information you have submitted here to complete the deliverable of your proposed Capstone Project and write the Capstone Final Report because these sections follow the outline of the Doctoral Capstone Report.  It is recommended that you use this form in a step-by-step way to help you design your study. Expect that you will go through several revisions before obtaining approval of this form. Research planning is an iterative process; each revision often sparking the need for further revisions until everything is aligned. These iterations and revisions are a necessary and customary part of the research process.

Do’s and Don’ts

  • Do use the correct form!
  • Don’t lock the form. That will stop you from editing and revising within the form.
  • Do complete the “Learner Information” and Section 1 first.
  • Don’t skip items or sections. If an item does not apply to your study, type “NA” in its field.
  • Don’t delete the descriptions and instructions in each section!
  • Do read the item descriptions carefully. Items request very specific information. Be sure you understand what is asked.
  • Do use primary sources to the greatest extent possible as references. Textbooks are NOT acceptable as the only references supporting methodological and design choices. Use textbooks to track down the primary sources.
  • If you change any design elements after your DPP is approved, you must submit a revised Doctoral Project Plan. A current DPP must be on file before your IRB application is submitted.

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS

 

Complete the following steps to prepare and submit your DPP for Scientific Merit Review (SMR) approval for your doctoral Capstone Project.

  • Keystone Learners: Your Keystone Instructor will facilitate the initial process.
  • Capstone Learners: Your Mentor will facilitate this process.

CITI Research Training

Mentees must complete the CITI Research training and submit your CITI completion certificate to your Keystone Instructor.

CITI Training Module

Milestone 1: Topic Approval

Complete Section 1 (1.1 and 1.2) of the DPP form for topic approval.

There are two ways to achieve Milestone 1:

  1. If Section 1 of your DPP meets the rigor for a viable topic, your keystone instructor will submit for school review. Receiving 80% on the DPP does not mean that it is ready for the topic plan review. 
    1. You will work on all sections of the DPP during the Keystone Course, even if you do not achieve topic approval. This will allow the Keystone Instructor to introduce you to the necessary components of the Doctoral Project Plan.  
  2. If Section 1 is not submitted for topic approval during the Keystone Course (HMSV8700), your Mentor will submit the topic plan in the Capstone Course – HMSV9971.

 

Milestones  2: Doctoral Project Plan

  1. Work with your Capstone Mentor to complete and make any necessary refinements to the DPP form.
    1. If you did not receive topic approval in the Keystone Course, you will refine sections 1 (1.1 and 1.2) and submit to your Capstone Mentor. Your Capstone Mentor will submit section 1 for topic approval. After topic approval, you will proceed to step 2.
  2. Once you have topic approval (whether in the Keystone or Capstone Course), you will refine and complete sections 2 – 7 in the DPP form. Make sure all sections are aligned with the DHS Programs of Professional Practice and the DHS Doctoral Capstone Handbook. —changes in one section could necessitate changes in another section.
  3. After you have a polished version, you should review the DPP criteria with the rubric to ensure you have provided the required information to demonstrate you have met each of the scientific merit criteria.
  4. Submit the completed form to your Capstone Mentor.

 

Scientific Merit Review(SMR)

The scientific merit reviewer will review each item against a rubric to determine whether you have met each of the criteria. You must meet all the criteria at a level of “Proficient” or greater to obtain reviewer approval. The reviewer will designate your Doctoral Project Plan (DPP)  as one of the following:

  • Approved
  • Deferred
  • Not Ready for Review

 

If the Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) is Deferred or Not Ready for Review:

  • The SMR reviewer will provide feedback on any criteria that you have not met.
  • You are required to make the necessary revisions and obtain approval for the revisions from your Mentor.
  • Once you have Mentor approval for your revisions, your Mentor will submit your Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) for a second review.
  • You will be notified if your Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) has been approved or deferred for revisions.
  • Up to three attempts to obtain Scientific Merit Review (SMR) approval are allowed. Researchers, Mentors, and Reviewers should make every possible attempt to resolve issues before the Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) is deferred for the third time. If a learner does not pass the scientific merit review on the third attempt, then the case will be referred to the Research Chair and/or Program Chair in your School for review, evaluation, and intervention.
  • While you await approval of your Doctoral Project Plan (DPP), you should begin working on your Ethics Paper. Your Mentor has a template for you to follow.
  • Once you have gained approval on your DPP (Milestone 2), you are ready to submit your Ethics Paper and IRB application and supporting documents for review by the IRB Committee.

 

Milestone 3: IRB Approval

  1. Once you obtain SMR approval, you will begin and complete an eight to 10 page ethics paper. This paper is a conceptual analysis of ethical principles typically related to all professional Capstone Projects.  Your Mentor has a template for you to follow.
  2. Once your Mentor has approved your Ethics Paper, you will complete your IRB application through IRBManager and submit any accompanying materials.
  3. Consult the Research and Scholarship area within iGuide for IRB forms and detailed process directions.

 

**You are required to obtain scientific merit approval (SMR) before you may receive IRB approval. Obtaining SMR approval does not guarantee that IRB approval will follow.

 

Milestone 4: Pre-Data Collection Call

  1. Once you have gained approval by the IRB, you are ready to schedule your Pre-Data Collection Conference Call. You may not proceed to data collection until you have completed this call.
  2. Work with your Mentor and Doctoral Committee to set a date for the conference call.
  3. Upon successful completion of the Pre-Data Collection Conference Call, your Mentor will mark Milestone 4 complete, and you may proceed with data collection.

 

 

 

Learner and Specialization Information

(MUST BE COMPETED)

 

Learners, please insert your answers directly into the expandable boxes that have been provided.

Learner Name Krystal Rozier
Learner Email Mztweety24@aol.com
Learner ID Number 2372205
Mentor Name  
Mentor Email  
Specialization (check one)   Leadership and Organizational Management

Program Evaluation and Data Analytics

Specialization Chair Name  
Specialization Chair Email  
Committee Member #1 Name  
Committee Member #1 Email  
Committee Member #2 Name  
Committee Member #2 Email  
Capstone Type (check one)   Research Paper

Professional Product

Deliverable (check one) Research Paper

Action Research Monograph

Program Evaluation

Professional Product

Service Project

Change Management Plan

 

 

 

 

 

Section 1.  Topic Endorsement

Please, use single-spaced, Times Roman 11 pt. throughout the form – the boxes will expand as you input text.

 

1.1         Capstone Topic (2 paragraphs)

Clearly describe the topic of the  Capstone Project.

 

This section should include:

        FIRST PARAGRAPH:  State the topic of the capstone project. The topic statement should include the problem or opportunity for improvement in the project.  The concepts of the topic must be clear and focused and well supported in the literature.

o    Begin this paragraph with, “The topic is…”

 

 

        SECOND PARAGRAPH: Describe the significance of this topic to Human Services AND the specialization within your program. Include a statement about the practical implications of the project by describing the impact of this Capstone Project on the organization or community of interest.

 

Example – The topic of this capstone project is the effectiveness of a transitional summer program, Helping Others, Inc., on middle school students’ chance of success (graduation) in high school. 

 

The topic should be correctly formed:

 

        The topic should be appropriate for the specialization.

        The topic should use appropriate language for key concepts/phenomena.

        The type of action proposed should be clearly specified.

        The community of interest/organization/program or community and target population should be named.

        The concepts should be appropriately focused.

        The topic should be supported by at least ten (10) citations.

        The topic should be in alignment with current literature and the DHS Programs of Professional Practice.

 

 

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

 

 

The topic of this capstone project is Reducing Juvenile Delinquency in the United States. According to an Office of the Justice Programs report, about 2.1 million youths under 18 get arrested due to juvenile-related crimes each year (Youth.gov, n.d.). Although there has been a positive impact on reducing the number of incarcerated juveniles, more effort needs to be put into realizing this goal (Delcea et al., 2019). About 1.7 million delinquency cases are filed in the courts each year. This topic will be appropriate for the project as it will assist in analyzing the root cause of juvenile delinquency and the relevant measures to curb the vice (Yun & Cui, 2020). The study will utilize state-of-the-art review and literature review to examine the national trend on juvenile delinquency. Therefore, there will be no active participants as the research will also use archival data and policies formulated by the justice department.

This topic is significant to human services since it focuses on reducing crime rates and juvenile cases in the community. The topic is also important because it seeks to provide a new understanding of the programs and policies that reduce juvenile crime (Bobbio et al., 2020). Consequently, this topic is important since it aims to reduce the mass incarceration of the youth. This strategy may help human services since the service personnel may feel less burdened when promoting community intervention (Guo, 2018; Singh & Punia, 2018). Additionally, the topic is significant to human services since it seeks to reduce the negative consequences of incarcerating the juveniles, such as trauma, overcrowding of prisons, and suicide risk. The study will also promote positive social change by teaching the community various effective strategies for reducing juvenile delinquency (Valasik & Barton, 2018). The topic of this capstone project is the effectiveness of early prevention programs among the youth to prevent possible crime involvement.

 

 

1.2 Research Problem (2 Paragraphs)

 

Write a brief statement of the problem or need for improvement at the capstone site or program. Clearly describe the gap in current practice, service, process, policy, and/or the identified outcome. Identify the performance gap you wish to close and the potential root causes of the problem.

 

This section should include:

        FIRST PARAGRAPH: Write a brief statement that fully describes the problem being addressed.  This paragraph introduces the problem that is informing the research and warrants the need for this study.

o    Begin this paragraph with the statement, “The problem is…”

 

Example: The problem is that Helping Others, Inc’s transitional summer program has not consistently improved high school graduation rates.

 

        SECOND PARAGRAPH: Identify the need for the study.  The need should be directly related to the problem presented in the first paragraph. It must clearly identify a gap in current practice, service, process, policy, or programs.  It must clearly identify the need for the research and the desired outcome.

 

Example: This study is needed because high school graduation rates are decreasing in the service community where Helping Others Inc. provides its transitional summer program.  Decreased graduation rates have negatively affected the unemployment rate in the area.

 

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

 

 

The problem being addressed is that juvenile delinquency is still a national problem despite the existing measures to curb the issue. According to Karibo (2020), peer pressure and access to illicit substances were the main enablers of crime among the youth. The study indicated the association of US teens with the Mexicans greatly affected their behavior and upbringing, hence engaged in criminal activities (Karibo, 2020). However, Kantemirova’s (2018) article indicated incomplete families also contributed to juvenile delinquency. Such a problem occurs when children fail to get good parenting from either parent (Hoffmann et al., 2018). These instances show that despite the efforts of the prevention programs, more adolescents find themselves in crime due to social factors. Thus, the topic will investigate these causes and recommend the appropriate measures to the issue.

The study is needed since there are increasing juvenile delinquency cases despite measures to prevent the problem and help the youth through juvenile justice. The identified gaps include an inadequate risk assessment to determine the at-risk youths and the predisposing factors (van der Put et al., 2021). Additionally, the literature identifies insufficient family and youth engagement in juvenile prevention programs (Love et al., 2016). Moreover, inappropriate re-entry programs contribute to recidivism, increasing the number of juveniles (Jain et al., 2018; Kubek et al., 2020). Therefore, this study will understand the scope of the problem and employ appropriate measures in juvenile justice.

 

References

Bobbio, A., Arbach, K., & Illescas, S. R. (2020). Juvenile delinquency risk factors: Individual, social, opportunity, or all of these together? International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice, 62, 100388. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijlcj.2020.100388

Delcea, C., Fabian, A. M., Radu, C. C., & Dumbravă, D. P. (2019). Juvenile delinquency within the forensic context. Rom J Leg Med27 (4), 366-372.

Guo, S. (2018). A model of religious involvement, family processes, self-control, and juvenile delinquency in two-parent families. Journal of adolescence, 63, 175-190. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2017.12.015

Hoffmann, J. P., & Dufur, M. J. (2018). Family social capital, family social bonds, and juvenile delinquency. American Behavioral Scientist, 62(11), 1525-1544. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002764218787020

Love, H., Harvell, S., & Winkler, M. K. (2016). Understanding Research and Practice Gaps in Juvenile Justice.

Jain, S., Cohen, A. K., Jagannathan, P., Leung, Y., Bassey, H., & Bedford, S. (2018). Evaluating the implementation of a collaborative juvenile re-entry system in Oakland, California. International journal of offender therapy and comparative criminology, 62(12), 3662-3680. https://doi.org/10.1177/0306624X18755480

Kantemirova, G. (2018). Incomplete family as a factor of crime in adolescents and youth. In SHS Web of Conferences (Vol. 55, p. 02020). EDP Sciences. https://doi.org/10.1051/shsconf/20185502020

Karibo, H. M. (2020). Rebels with a Cause: Policing Juvenile Delinquency in the Southwest Borderlands. Journal of the Southwest, 62(3), 515-542. https://doi.org/10.1353/jsw.2020.0021

Kubek, J. B., Tindall-Biggins, C., Reed, K., Carr, L. E., & Fenning, P. A. (2020). A systematic literature review of school re-entry practices among youth impacted by juvenile justice. Children and Youth Services Review, 110, 104773. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.104773

Singh, B., & Punia, V. (2018). Role of value-based education in reducing juvenile delinquency at school level. Educational Quest-An International Journal of Education and Applied Social Sciences, 9(3), 229-232. http://dx.doi.org/10.30954/2230-7311.2018.12.4

Valasik, M., & Barton, M. S. (2018). The George Wilson effect: does intergenerational closure, and collective efficacy reduce juvenile delinquency in a neighborhood? Deviant Behavior, 39(12), 1658-1671. https://doi.org/10.1080/01639625.2017.1410630

van der Put, C. E., Boekhout van Solinge, N. F., Stams, G. J., Hoeve, M., & Assink, M. (2021). Effects of awareness programs on juvenile delinquency: a three-level meta-analysis. International journal of offender therapy and comparative criminology, 65(1), 68-91. https://doi.org/10.1177/0306624X20909239

Youth.gov. (n.d.). Youth involved with the Juvenile Justice System. https://youth.gov/youth-topics/juvenile-justice/youth-involved-juvenile-justice-system

Yun, H. J., & Cui, M. (2020). The effects of parental warmth on adolescent delinquency in the United States and South Korea: a cross-cultural perspective. Journal of youth and adolescence, 49(1), 228-237. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-019-01078-z

 

 

Learners

Specialization Chair Topic Approval

•      After completing Section 1, Keystone or Capstone Learners should submit the DPP form to your Keystone Instructor or Capstone Mentor for approval.

•      Collaborate with your Keystone Instructor or Capstone Mentor until you have approval for Section 1, “Topic Approval.”

•      After you have received your Mentor’s approval for Section 1, your form will be submitted for SMR review.

 

Approved

Deferred

Not Ready For Review

Reviewer Name:

Reviewer signature:

Date:

Comments:

 

 

Section 2.  Rationale for Study
2.1 Capstone Project Problem Background

This section should further expound on the research problem and will include a brief SUMMARY of the review and synthesis of the research literature on the topic. This should include citations from at least 15 articles but should indicate that you have performed a full review of the literature on the topic.

This section should include:

        A statement about the body of existing literature on the topic.

        A summary of recent research findings on the topic that highlights the most relevant findings of the proposed study.

        A demonstration of how the proposed research could add to the existing literature on the topic.

 

Be sure to provide appropriate in text citations and include references in the reference section.

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

 

*This will not be your Capstone Project literature review but an initial foundation. You will continue to add to your literature review throughout your Capstone.

 

Annotated Bibliography

Bobbio, A., Arbach, K., & Illescas, S. R. (2020). Juvenile delinquency risk factors: Individual, social, opportunity, or all of these together? International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice, 62, 100388. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijlcj.2020.100388

This article discusses the risk factors associated with juvenile crime. According to the authors, there was a gap in studying crime rates in Latin America. Thus, the study focused on identifying the correlation between criminal risk and antisocial behavior and criminal opportunities. The study involved self-reported and official antisocial behavior from the participants. The findings indicated a significant relationship between delinquency rates and the social and crime opportunity risk factors. Therefore, the author recommended methods to prevent delinquency, such as early prevention and community involvement.

Delcea, C., Fabian, A. M., Radu, C. C., & Dumbravă, D. P. (2019). Juvenile delinquency within the forensic context. Rom J Leg Med27 (4), 366-372.

This article emphasized the risk factors of juvenile delinquency. The authors stressed the risk factors according to the forensic context. Besides, the authors theorized factors such as family problems and education issues could contribute to juvenile crime. The findings showed that the family played a role in educating the adolescents hence was an important pillar in preventing crime. Similarly, the authors stated that poverty could also lead to juvenile delinquency as neglected children would become criminals for survival. Children with lower educational levels were also likely to engage in crime than those who had completed their studies. Hence, the authors recommended prevention programs from both the school and families.

Du, Y. (2019). Developing an integrated biosocial theory to understand juvenile delinquency: from the social, cognitive, affective, and moral (SCAM) perspectives. International Journal of Contemporary Pediatrics, 6(2), 897-903. http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2349-3291.ijcp20180001

This article examines the biosocial theory and its role in preventing juvenile crime. The report indicates cognitive perspective as a predictor of juvenile delinquency since self-control may influence individuals to engage in crime. Moreover, social factors such as peer groups and peer pressure may affect people’s engagement in crime. The moral perspective may also influence adolescents to engage in crime based on what one may consider good or bad. Therefore, the authors recommended that prevention programs for juvenile delinquency target high-risk youth in high-risk areas. These may include skill-building programs, community-based programs, and policies to assist community agencies.

Fearnow-Kenney, M., Hill, P., & Gore, N. (2016). Child and parent voices on a community-based prevention program (FAST). School Community Journal, 26(1), 223-238.

This article examines the Families and Schools Together (FAST) program that focuses on preventing adolescents’ delinquent behaviors, such as substance abuse, crime, school failure, and violence. According to the article, the FAST program encourages parents to use the community and school resources to interact with their children positively. This method ensures positive behavioral change among adolescents, preventing juvenile delinquency. Hence, the authors acknowledge the involvement of parents in school programs for crime prevention.

Guo, S. (2018). A model of religious involvement, family processes, self-control, and juvenile delinquency in two-parent families. Journal of adolescence, 63, 175-190. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2017.12.015

This article discusses the relationship between the social factors and juvenile delinquency compared across various families. The authors indicated that religious involvement and social control could prevent juvenile delinquency. The study’s hypothesis was religious involvement of the parents could prevent juvenile delinquency. However, the findings showed no direct influence of parents’ religious involvement on juvenile delinquency. Nevertheless, adolescent religious involvement and good parenting practices were responsible for preventing adolescent criminal activities.

Hoffmann, J. P., & Dufur, M. J. (2018). Family social capital, family social bonds, and juvenile delinquency. American Behavioral Scientist, 62(11), 1525-1544. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002764218787020

This study explains the relationship between social bonds and juvenile delinquency. The focus of the research was to examine how family social bonds and family social capital affected adolescent behavior. The findings showed family social bonds such as monitoring and involvement influenced crime prevention. Monitoring ensured parents were strict on their children’s behavior while involvement encouraged the adolescents to report what they did away from home. However, the authors recommended future researchers examine how juvenile delinquency might diminish family social capital and its effects on juvenile delinquency.

Love, H., Harvell, S., & Winkler, M. K. (2016). Understanding research and practice gaps in juvenile justice.

This article discusses the measures that prevent juvenile delinquency based on various approaches implemented over the decades. The authors acknowledged that some of the recommendations do not reach the stakeholders; hence they do not execute in the juvenile justice system. Nevertheless, the study identified gaps such as applying research to practice, engaging youth and families, implementing sustainable re-entry practices, and implementing risk assessments as a hindrance to preventing juvenile delinquency. Thus, the authors suggested working with community agencies to implement these strategies to prevent juvenile delinquency.

Jain, S., Cohen, A. K., Jagannathan, P., Leung, Y., Bassey, H., & Bedford, S. (2018). Evaluating the implementation of a collaborative juvenile re-entry system in Oakland, California. International journal of offender therapy and comparative criminology, 62(12), 3662-3680. https://doi.org/10.1177/0306624X18755480

This study is important as it discusses the effectiveness of the re-entry program among juveniles. According to the authors, a collaborative community re-entry program reduces recidivism, public safety, and youth development. However, the study findings showed differing agency agendas and limited youth engagement in the re-entry programs in Oakland, California. Nevertheless, the authors recommended that future researchers and stakeholders implement integrated system-level processes and organizational change to promote positive practices in juvenile re-entry programs.

Kantemirova, G. (2018). Incomplete family as a factor of crime in adolescents and youth. In SHS Web of Conferences (Vol. 55, p. 02020). EDP Sciences. https://doi.org/10.1051/shsconf/20185502020

This article examines the family as a social factor of juvenile delinquency. According to the author, an incomplete family contributes to criminal activity among adolescents due to a lack of parental control. The study findings showed that 62.3% of female and 52.9% of male adolescent criminals came from broken families, either divorced or children out of wedlock. However, the author recommended state youth policy, including support from the state and community to the adolescents. This approach would help create a conducive environment for youth education and secure employment to prevent future involvement in the crime.

Karibo, H. M. (2020). Rebels with a cause: policing juvenile delinquency in the Southwest Borderlands. Journal of the Southwest, 62(3), 515-542. https://doi.org/10.1353/jsw.2020.0021

This article examines the factors that led to juvenile delinquency among teens living across the US-Mexican border. The authors found that proximity to the border created access to illicit substances such as liquor, heroin, barbiturates, marijuana, and pornographic material. Therefore, the authors found that changes in economic factors and family dynamics along the border led to behavior change among the teens leading to juvenile delinquency. The increasing cultural exchange posed great danger to the adolescents in the region, such that the government banned persons below 21 years from crossing the border. The recommendations include restricting the movement of people between the border towns and surveillance of controlled substances that might influence the youth into juvenile delinquency.

Kubek, J. B., Tindall-Biggins, C., Reed, K., Carr, L. E., & Fenning, P. A. (2020). A systematic literature review of school re-entry practices among youth impacted by juvenile justice. Children and Youth Services Review, 110, 104773. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.104773

This study focuses on the re-entry programs for the youth who have been through the juvenile justice system. The study’s purpose was to examine the barriers that such adolescents face during school re-entry. The findings showed inadequate support groups for the school re-entry programs among the incarcerated youth. Besides, the authors found that different levels such as individual, family, and school barriers may prevent successful re-entry for the youth. Nevertheless, the authors indicated a lack of scientific inquiry to scrutinize the re-entry programs. The recommendations included involving the school and the affiliated stakeholders to ensure smooth system acceptance.

Pitzel, A., Kearley, A., Jolivette, K., & Sanders, S. (2021). Contextualizing mentoring programs into juvenile justice facilities. Journal of Correctional Education, 72(2), 5-23.

This study focuses on mentoring programs to support offenders in juvenile justice facilities. According to the article, mentorship for incarcerated youth is important as it helps them transition back into the community. This approach would prevent high recidivism rates among juveniles. The authors recommend developing mentoring programs that offer effective guidance and encouragement to adolescents. This approach would ensure they practice good behavior when back to the communities.

Singh, B., & Punia, V. (2018). Role of value-based education in reducing juvenile delinquency at school level. Educational Quest-An International Journal of Education and Applied Social Sciences, 9(3), 229-232. http://dx.doi.org/10.30954/2230-7311.2018.12.4

This article discusses the significance of value-based education among the youth to reduce juvenile delinquency. According to the authors, modern technology and social media have greatly influenced youth behavior due to increased engagement and inadequate supervision from their seniors. Therefore, depression rates and societal pressure are on the rise. Adolescents may engage in crime to fulfill their desires and be part of a clique. The authors examined value-based education programs such as engagement in co-curricular activities to boost cooperation and self-confidence among the youth. Moreover, the study indicated that teachers have a significant role in enhancing behavioral change among the youth to prevent juvenile delinquency.

Vilalta, C. J., & Fondevila, G. (2021). Drug interactions and juvenile delinquency in Mexico. Journal of School Violence, 1-15. https://doi.org/10.1080/15388220.2021.1979019

This article analyzes the relationship between alcohol and marijuana consumption and property crime among Mexican adolescents. The researchers hypothesized that teens using drugs were highly likely to engage in crime. The findings indicated that adolescents who used marijuana were more likely to engage in crime than those who used alcohol. The study also showed that other factors such as disrupted families and drug dealing in school increased the likelihood of crime engagement among the teens. However, the authors found a gap in the interaction of school characteristics and drugs in juvenile delinquency. Hence, the authors recommended future researchers examine this relationship to property crime.

Walters, G. D. (2016). Neighborhood context, youthful offending, and peer selection: does it take a village to raise a non-delinquent? Criminal justice review, 41(1), 5-20. https://doi.org/10.1177/0734016815606783

This article discusses the role of society in preventing juvenile delinquency. The purpose of the study was to examine how a neighborhood could contribute to antisocial peers or future offensive behavior. The study findings showed that a negative psychological environment encouraged offending behavior among the boys in the neighborhood. Besides, the boys developed antisocial behaviors when brought up in such a neighborhood, contributing to delinquent behaviors. The authors recommended parental control to suppress adolescents’ future delinquency and antisocial behavior.

 

Rationale for the Study

Various factors contribute to the rise of crime among adolescents. According to Bobbio et al. (2020), there is a correlation between criminal risk and antisocial behavior and criminal opportunities. A similar study indicated that family problems and education issues could contribute to juvenile crime (Delcea et al., 2019; Walters, 2016). The authors demonstrated that children from broken families and low education levels were more likely to engage in crime than their peers (Kantemirova, 2018). Similarly, parental religious involvement was not responsible for preventing crime among teens (Guo, 2018). Instead, good parenting practices may prevent teens from engaging in crime (Fearnow-Kenney et al., 2016). Hoffmann and Dufur (2018) indicated that weak family bonds contributed to high crime rates among adolescents due to a lack of guidance. Although previous studies involved recommending policies for juvenile delinquency prevention, some organizations failed to adopt these measures (Love et al., 2016). This move created more problems as the agencies failed to prevent increased crime and recidivism rates.

A study by Jain et al. (2016) showed that limited youth engagement resulted in ineffective re-entry programs in Oakland, California. Kubek et al. (2020) and Du (2019) also found that inadequate support groups for the incarcerated youth prevented successful re-entry into the school system. Likewise, Pitzel et al. (2021) found that limited mentorship programs may prevent recidivism among incarcerated juveniles. Singh and Punia (2018) also indicated that technology and social media contributed to juvenile crime due to peer pressure and inadequate supervision from seniors. Other contributing factors to juvenile delinquency include drug and alcohol abuse among teens (Karibo, 2020; Vilalta & Fondevila, 2021). These themes show that different risk factors encourage juvenile delinquency and require multiple approaches to address the issue. Therefore, the proposed research would add to the existing literature by examining these risk factors to offer viable solutions and policies to prevent juvenile delinquency.

 

2.2 Need for the Project and Evidence to Make Change

Provide a rationale supported by current information regarding the need for this Capstone Project.

This section should include:

        The results of a needs assessment or an analysis for the project.

        A description of issues identified in the workplace, project, or community.

        Any relevant population and organizational demographics and statistics related to the proposed Capstone Project.

        A description of why the study is important.

        A description of whom the study will benefit.

 

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

 

 

 

The juvenile prevention program will be important in creating awareness about suffering among incarcerated youth. Besides, this program will prevent overcrowding of juvenile justice facilities since there will be alternative methods of crime prevention among adolescents (Kubek et al., 2020). The program will also reduce recidivism rates among adolescents and propose effective re-entry programs (Kubek et al., 2020). The literature search indicated various factors contributing to juvenile delinquency, such as drug abuse, incomplete families, peer pressure, poverty, and poor education programs. These problems will warrant research in the topic to identify community prevention programs to solve juvenile delinquency and recidivism.

The Office of the Justice Programs indicated about 2.1 million youths under 18 get arrested due to juvenile-related crimes each year (Youth.gov, n.d.). Similarly, about 1.7 million cases involving juveniles get filed in the courts each year (Youth.gov, n.d). Although the numbers have been decreasing in the past years, the statistics still show many juvenile delinquencies. Therefore, the project will be important in identifying the most effective methods of preventing juvenile delinquency. This study is also essential since it provides knowledge about the association of risk factors and juvenile delinquency. Furthermore, the study is crucial as it will impact positive social change by informing policymakers and social agencies about the impactful community programs (Raposa et al., 2019). The awareness created by the project will also promote positive behavior among adolescents to prevent any involvement in the crime. Hence, the study will benefit the adolescents by deterring them from engaging in crime disrupting their social life. Besides, the study will help parents and community agencies adopt the proposed strategies to prevent crime (Fearnow-Kenney et al., 2016). The juvenile justice system and policymakers will also benefit from the study by adopting the approach to ensure crime prevention and reduced recidivism rates among juveniles who have been incarcerated.

 

References

Bobbio, A., Arbach, K., & Illescas, S. R. (2020). Juvenile delinquency risk factors: Individual, social, opportunity, or all of these together? International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice, 62, 100388. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijlcj.2020.100388

Delcea, C., Fabian, A. M., Radu, C. C., & Dumbravă, D. P. (2019). Juvenile delinquency within the forensic context. Rom J Leg Med27 (4), 366-372.

Du, Y. (2019). Developing an integrated biosocial theory to understand juvenile delinquency: from the social, cognitive, affective, and moral (SCAM) perspectives. International Journal of Contemporary Pediatrics, 6(2), 897-903. http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2349-3291.ijcp20180001

Fearnow-Kenney, M., Hill, P., & Gore, N. (2016). Child and parent voices on a community-based prevention program (FAST). School Community Journal, 26(1), 223-238.

Guo, S. (2018). A model of religious involvement, family processes, self-control, and juvenile delinquency in two-parent families. Journal of adolescence, 63, 175-190. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2017.12.015

Hoffmann, J. P., & Dufur, M. J. (2018). Family social capital, family social bonds, and juvenile delinquency. American Behavioral Scientist, 62(11), 1525-1544. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002764218787020

Love, H., Harvell, S., & Winkler, M. K. (2016). Understanding research and practice gaps in juvenile justice.

Jain, S., Cohen, A. K., Jagannathan, P., Leung, Y., Bassey, H., & Bedford, S. (2018). Evaluating the implementation of a collaborative juvenile re-entry system in Oakland, California. International journal of offender therapy and comparative criminology, 62(12), 3662-3680. https://doi.org/10.1177/0306624X18755480

Kantemirova, G. (2018). Incomplete family as a factor of crime in adolescents and youth. In SHS Web of Conferences (Vol. 55, p. 02020). EDP Sciences. https://doi.org/10.1051/shsconf/20185502020

Karibo, H. M. (2020). Rebels with a cause: policing juvenile delinquency in the Southwest Borderlands. Journal of the Southwest, 62(3), 515-542. https://doi.org/10.1353/jsw.2020.0021

Kubek, J. B., Tindall-Biggins, C., Reed, K., Carr, L. E., & Fenning, P. A. (2020). A systematic literature review of school re-entry practices among youth impacted by juvenile justice. Children and Youth Services Review, 110, 104773. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.104773

Pitzel, A., Kearley, A., Jolivette, K., & Sanders, S. (2021). Contextualizing mentoring programs into juvenile justice facilities. Journal of Correctional Education, 72(2), 5-23.

Raposa, E. B., Rhodes, J., Stams, G. J. J., Card, N., Burton, S., Schwartz, S., … & Hussain, S. (2019). The effects of youth mentoring programs: A meta-analysis of outcome studies. Journal of youth and adolescence, 48(3), 423-443. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-019-00982-8

Singh, B., & Punia, V. (2018). Role of value-based education in reducing juvenile delinquency at school level. Educational Quest-An International Journal of Education and Applied Social Sciences, 9(3), 229-232. http://dx.doi.org/10.30954/2230-7311.2018.12.4

Vilalta, C. J., & Fondevila, G. (2021). Drug interactions and juvenile delinquency in Mexico. Journal of School Violence, 1-15. https://doi.org/10.1080/15388220.2021.1979019

Walters, G. D. (2016). Neighborhood context, youthful offending, and peer selection: does it take a village to raise a non-delinquent? Criminal justice review, 41(1), 5-20. https://doi.org/10.1177/0734016815606783

Youth.gov. (n.d.). Youth involved with the Juvenile Justice System. https://youth.gov/youth-topics/juvenile-justice/youth-involved-juvenile-justice-system

 

2.3 Theoretical Foundations

Briefly describe the primary theoretical framework or model to be used for the study that will serve as the lens through which you will view the research problem and research questions.

 

NOTE:  The theoretical foundation should be a theory from your discipline that supports the topic and should reflect on how you understand the topic and constructs in the study. To select the theory of model for the study, review the DHS Programs of Professional Practice.

 

 

This section should include:

·         A review or discussion of the theory that will guide the project.

·         An explanation of how the theory or model defines the variables or constructs of the study.

·         An explanation of how the theory or model will guide the study.

·         A list and explanation of any study assumptions.

 

 

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

 

 

 

2.4 Researchers Positionality

In this section, you will define your role, position, and how positionality will impact your research study.

 

This section should include:

·         The title of your role or position in the organization, program, or community in your site.

·         A description of your job duties at the site.

·         A description of how your position will impact the research project.

·         A statement that identifies if you are an insider (work or volunteer with the organization) or outsider, or a collaborator with insiders (no affiliation, but working with stakeholders within the organization).

 

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

 

Researcher’s Positionality

Since my capstone project involves reducing juvenile delinquency in the United States, I have no active role in the program. However, I am an advocate for the program by promoting policies to reduce juvenile delinquency. I will also work with other stakeholders in the community to identify the problems the adolescents face to know the risk factors of crime. As an advocate for the community, I will support the community in determining the best strategies to prevent juvenile delinquency. Similarly, I will help communities identify their needs relating to re-entry programs for the incarcerated youth.

My duties for the program will include designing a research method to study the various causes and trends of juvenile delinquency. Besides, my role will involve evaluating the proposed strategies and communicating the results between the management and the stakeholders (Campbell et al., 2018). Since I will work on the project at the national level, I will help create awareness of the issue in the community to mobilize other stakeholders such as parents and schools to prevent the problem. Similarly, I will conduct needs assessments in different communities to learn how they have previously handled juvenile delinquency (Campbell et al., 2018). This approach will help create programs that will reduce juvenile delinquency.

As an advocate for the program, my position will impact the research project by promoting social change in the community. Identifying the risk factors will help policymakers and other stakeholders implement viable solutions to reduce juvenile delinquency (Campbell et al., 2018). Additionally, my role will significantly impact the project since I will provide crucial information for the problem statement and risk analysis. This info will further allow in-depth analysis to identify strategies for reducing juvenile delinquency. Consequently, the information I will provide during the research project will help policymakers focus on working plans rather than the strategy that failed in the past.

Since I will not work directly with the organization, I will be a collaborator on the project and work with the stakeholders to address the issue. These participants will include state and federal experts (Almog-Bar & Schmid, 2018). The collaboration will help identify the best approach to implementing the proposed strategies in the community.

References

Almog-Bar, M., & Schmid, H. (2018). Cross-sector partnerships in human services: Insights and organizational dilemmas. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 47(4_suppl), 119S-138S. https://doi.org/10.1177/0899764018771218

Campbell, C., Papp, J., Barnes, A., Onifade, E., & Anderson, V. (2018). Risk assessment and juvenile justice: An interaction between risk, race, and gender. Criminology & Public Policy, 17(3), 525-545. https://doi.org/10.1111/1745-9133.12377

 

 

 

2.5 Practical Implications

Please describe the specific practical implications of your findings that can be used by the stakeholders.

 

This section should include:

        A minimum of two (2) paragraphs.  Every statement must be supported by the literature.

        A description of the specific practical implications (who may benefit) from the research that can be used by any or all of the following stakeholders:

o    the population being studied,

o    practitioners, clinicians, or medical practitioners,

o    community-based service providers or health organizations,

o    educators, colleges/universities or

o    the wider community itself.

 

 

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

 

REMEMBER

 

NOTE: Be cognizant of the limitations and scope of the proposed research.  Do not promise practical implications that are beyond the scope of the research.

 

Practical Implications

The research findings would be significant in identifying methods of reducing juvenile delinquency. Hence, the study will be necessary for the adolescents since it will help them know the strategies they could use to stay away from crime (Sawyer & Wagner, 2020). Such methods would involve engaging in peer support groups and healthy activities such as sports and clubs to keep them engaged. Additionally, the research would benefit medical practitioners by reducing the number of complications related to drug abuse and mental health issues (Semenza, 2018). Since the study will help reduce incidences of juvenile delinquency by suppressing the risk factors, there will be a significant reduction in the health implications (Semenza, 2018). Thus, the medical practitioners will have dedicated periods to focus on quality healthcare among the youth.

Similarly, the study will impact community-based service providers by introducing counselling programs to help the youth. The service providers will learn how to formulate programs that focus on the well-being of the youth to prevent juvenile delinquency (Pitzel et al., 2021). Additionally, the schools will implement programs that cater to the students’ emotional well-being. Since the literature review identified the school environment as contributing factor to juvenile delinquency, the research will allow the educators and colleges to provide a safe environment for the students (Singh & Punia, 2018). This approach would enable the adolescents to speak up when faced with an issue reducing the prevalence of delinquency.

Moreover, the research findings will impact the community by making it safe for the residents. The study will help eliminate risk factors and other factors escalated by delinquents such as gangs and drug cartels in the community (Walters, 2016). This approach will help create a safe environment for children and the community members since they will not be at risk of attack or unsafe neighborhood for children upbringing (Walters, 2016). Therefore, the research findings will help stakeholders positively impact the study population and the community.

References

Pitzel, A., Kearley, A., Jolivette, K., & Sanders, S. (2021). Contextualizing mentoring programs into juvenile justice facilities. Journal of Correctional Education, 72(2), 5-23.

Sawyer, W., & Wagner, P. (2020). Mass incarceration: The whole pie 2020. Prison Policy Initiative, 24.

Semenza, D. C. (2018). Health behaviors and juvenile delinquency. Crime & Delinquency, 64(11), 1394-1416. https://doi.org/10.1177/0011128717719427

Singh, B., & Punia, V. (2018). Role of value-based education in reducing juvenile delinquency at school level. Educational Quest-An International Journal of Education and Applied Social Sciences, 9(3), 229-232. http://dx.doi.org/10.30954/2230-7311.2018.12.4

Walters, G. D. (2016). Neighborhood context, youthful offending, and peer selection: does it take a village to raise a non-delinquent? Criminal justice review, 41(1), 5-20. https://doi.org/10.1177/0734016815606783

 

 

Section 3.  Research Theory
3.1 Purpose of the Study

State the purpose of the study. The purpose of the study is to answer the research question or provide practical answers to a problem or weaknesses of the current practice, service, or process, policy.

 

This section should include:

 

        A summary of the intended outcomes of the study.

        An identification of who can benefit from this research and how they might benefit.

        A statement of the purpose of the study and the need that it addresses.

        A statement about the outcomes or findings of the Capstone Project and how they will be sustained.

 

 

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

 

 

 

 

The purpose of this study is to investigate various strategies for reducing juvenile delinquency among teens in the United States. The expected study outcomes will include developing policies that reduce recidivism rates within the US. The study will also help decongest the juvenile detention centers while providing alternative sentencing methods for the accused individuals (Bobbio et al., 2020). The study will benefit both the juvenile justice system and the teens since there will be fewer incarcerated. Additionally, the research will inform the justice and social service about the different methods they could implement for continuous success (Karibo, 2020). The community will also benefit from the research by reducing crime rates and developing youth programs. Moreover, the study’s outcome will impact social change through community policymaking (Raposa et al., 2019). Therefore, studying this topic will allow understanding the risk factors of juvenile delinquency to create awareness of the same.

References

Bobbio, A., Arbach, K., & Illescas, S. R. (2020). Juvenile delinquency risk factors: Individual, social, opportunity, or all of these together? International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice, 62, 100388. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijlcj.2020.100388

Karibo, H. M. (2020). Rebels with a cause: policing juvenile delinquency in the Southwest Borderlands. Journal of the Southwest, 62(3), 515-542. https://doi.org/10.1353/jsw.2020.0021

Raposa, E. B., Rhodes, J., Stams, G. J. J., Card, N., Burton, S., Schwartz, S., … & Hussain, S. (2019). The effects of youth mentoring programs: A meta-analysis of outcome studies. Journal of youth and adolescence, 48(3), 423-443. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-019-00982-8

3.2 Research Question(s)

List the primary research question and any sub-questions that the proposed study will address.  The research question(s) should be correctly formed.

 

This section should include a research question(s) or sub-questions that:

 

        Align with the research problem, the research topic, and the Capstone title.

        Identify the intended analysis.

        Is phrased in a way that will be answered by the intended methodology and analyses.

        Identify the specific variables to be explored, use language consistent with the research design or approach, and clearly identify the population being studied.

 

Qualitative Example: How can DHS caseworkers help the homeless population become self-sufficient?

 

Quantitative Example: How does employee morale in millennial research analysts affect creativity?

 

 

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

The research questions are:

  1. What are the programs that consistently and reliably reduce delinquency?
  2. What are the characteristics or traits of effective programs in reducing juvenile delinquency?
3.3 Capstone Project Title

The  Capstone Project Title should be correctly formed:

 

        The title should be aligned with the  Research Problem (1.2) and Research Question (2.2), (use the same terminology for all).

        The title should reflect the key variables or constructs to be studied.

        The title should reflect the method to be employed in the research.

        The title should be concise (12 words or less).

 

 

Reducing Juvenile Delinquency in the United States
 

Section 4. Research Methodology

 

4.1 Summary of methodology

Briefly describe the Capstone Project research design.

 

This section should include:

        A description of the methodology (qualitative or quantitative).

        A description of the design (case study, generic qualitative, correlation, etc.).

        A description of the type of action research (participatory action, critical action research, action science research, or appreciative inquiry).

        A description of what data will be collected (validated instruments, interviews, archival data, organization policies, and procedures, etc.).

        A description of data analysis that will be used (thematic analysis, descriptive statistics, inferential statistics).

The research will be a qualitative study to investigate the effective strategies for reducing juvenile delinquency in the United States. The qualitative research will be appropriate since it will allow the researcher to gain in-depth information from the collected data. Therefore, the study will utilize an action research monograph to study juvenile delinquency. This type of research will complement the existing findings by investigating the results and theories of other researchers (Stringer & Aragón, 2020). Besides, the research design will allow the researcher to participate in the study and examine the immediate problem affecting the selected population. The method will investigate the weaknesses of previous strategies and recommend new ways of reducing juvenile delinquency. The study will collect archival data, organizational policies, and data from earlier studies discussing strategies for reducing juvenile delinquency (Burgers et al., 2019). This literature search will be conducted in various databases such as EBSCOhost, Google Scholar, and Web of Science databases. After that, thematic content analysis will identify the literature’s common themes to determine the most effective methods of reducing juvenile delinquency.

References

Burgers, C., Brugman, B. C., & Boeynaems, A. (2019). Systematic literature reviews: Four applications for interdisciplinary research. Journal of Pragmatics, 145, 102-109. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pragma.2019.04.004

Stringer, E. T., & Aragón, A. O. (2020). Action research. Sage publications.

 

4.2a Quantitative Measures and Instruments

List and describe each variable and the data collection instrument or measurement tool you will use to collect these data. These should include standardized questionnaires, demographic data, and surveys, etc.  See Appendix A for an example of a completed chart. Only standardized instruments can be used in quantitative studies.

 

Attach a copy of each instrument you plan to use as an appendix to the  Capstone research form.

 

Variable Type Variable Name Survey/Questions/ Calculations Variable Level of Measurement Instrument Name Reliability Estimates
           
           
           
           
           

*Insert more rows as needed

 

4.2b Qualitative Constructs and Interview Guide

List and describe each qualitative construct and the data collection method you will use to collect these data. Include the alignment of the data collection source with the concept. See Appendix B for an example of a completed chart.

 

Attach a copy of the interview guide you plan to use

as an appendix to the  Research Plan.

 

Data Source Specific Data Source Constructs of Interest Specific Interview Question
       
       
       
       
       

*Insert more rows as needed

 

*4.3 Field Tests

Only complete if the research study is greater than minimal risk.

 

Field tests must be completed for qualitative interview questions if the study is greater than minimal risk. 

 

According to 45 CFR 46.102(i), minimal risk means, “The probability and magnitude of harm or discomfort anticipated in the research are not greater in and of themselves than those ordinarily encountered in daily life or during the performance of routine physical or psychological examinations or tests.”

 

If you are unclear about the nature of the study, please consult with the Research Chair or Capella’s IRB.  IRB approval is not required before a field test is conducted.  The results of the field test should be submitted as part of the IRB application once the DPP is approved.  Field test experts should be practitioners in the field that are knowledgeable about the topic.  You may use a Capella faculty who has a relevant background.

 

 

This section should include:

        A list of the original interview questions (before the field test).

        A rationale for each original interview question that explains how the question will provide answers to the specific research question.

        The identification of field test experts (name and credentials).

        A description of the suggestions, comments, or recommendations from the field test experts.

        A list of the final, updated interview questions.

 

 

 

 

 

4.4 Data Analysis

Detail the actual data analyses to be conducted to address each research question.

 

For each research question and sub-question provide the following:

        A description of the data source.

        A description of how raw data will be analyzed (transcription, calculation of scaled variables, etc.).

        A description of how data will be managed, processed, and prepared.

        The method of qualitative analysis or statistical analysis.

        A description of how data will be stored and protected.

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.5 Sample Size

For each data source, describe the sample size, and provide references to support sample size decisions.

 

 

 

 

4.6 Assumptions

Identify the key (A) theoretical, (B) topical, and (C) methodological assumptions of the Capstone Project.

 

This section should include:

A.    A description of the theoretical assumptions which will include the fundamental constructs of the theoretical foundation that you selected in Section 2.3.

B.    A description of the topical assumptions which will include the assumptions revealed from previous research, the literature on the  topic, and assumptions made by researchers in the  field.

C.    A description of the methodological assumptions which will include an explanation of the epistemological, ontological, and axiological philosophical assumptions that support the research methodology.

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.7 Limitations

Evaluate the weaknesses of the Capstone Project at this time.

 

This section should include:

        The areas that need to be improved before starting the Capstone Project.

        The areas that cannot be improved.

        The reasons for not redesigning to address any of the limitations identified.

 
Section 5 Sample and Design (Approach)
5.1 Sampling and Recruitment

For each data source, describe the sampling plan. Describe how you plan to select the sample. Include the steps you will take to recruit participants.

 

This section should include:

        A brief description of the data source, the sampling plan, and inclusion and exclusion criteria.

        The recruitment strategies (where applicable).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.2 Expected Site

Describe the organization or site(s) from which you expect to draw the sample.

 

This section should include:

        The name of the agency.

        The type of agency (profit, nonprofit, government).

        The population served.

        The agency’s mission and/or human services they provide.

 

 

 

 

5.3 Site Permission

This section should include:

        The name of the authorized individual allowing the use of the organization or site.

        A statement of whether the site has an IRB.

        The process to obtain permission to access the stakeholders, population, or data source.

 

 

 

 

5.4 Participant Contact

How will potential participants first be contacted? How will participants be contacted following the study?

The capstone project will be an action research monograph. Therefore, the study will require no participants as the data will be collected through a literature review. The literature review will involve analyzing existing literature to determine effective programs in reducing juvenile delinquency. The review will also include collecting qualitative data from scholarly journals to identify common themes from the studies. This approach will allow the researcher to understand how stakeholders have proposed and implemented strategies to reduce juvenile delinquency.

An extensive search will be conducted to select scholarly articles published within the last five years from reputable databases. These will include the Ebscohost database, ProQuest databases, Open Dissertations, Research Library Prep, and Research Library. Moreover, some journals will be retrieved from Sage Online and the Google Scholar search engine. The key term used in the search will be ‘juvenile delinquency.’ The method will ensure the search retrieves scholarly articles related to juvenile delinquency and the risk factors. Furthermore, some information will be sourced from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) through the Youth.gov (n.d.) website. This website will be helpful in the research since it provides information on the risk factors and effective programs necessary to reduce juvenile delinquency. The website also contains statistics on juvenile cases and the juvenile justice system; hence will be appropriate in understanding the extent of the problem.

Reference

Youth.gov. (n.d.). Youth involved with the Juvenile Justice System. https://youth.gov/youth-topics/juvenile-justice/youth-involved-juvenile-justice-system

5.5 Action Plan and Time Frame

Describe the steps and time it will take to complete the Capstone Project. Provide a quarter-by-quarter listing of activities from start to finish. Describe the exact procedures that will be needed to carry out this study.  This should read like a recipe for conducting the study. Be sure to include all the necessary details so that someone else would be able to follow this to replicate the study. (See Appendix C for an example of a completed chart.)

 

This section should include:

        A step-by-step description of exactly how the research will be conducted.

Quarter Activity Estimated Time Frame
Winter 2022 Milestone 1: Topic Approval, eportfolio, Citi Research training, Section 1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, 4.5,5.1, 5.4, 5.5, 6.1 and 6.2 3 months
Spring 2022 Milestone 2: Doctoral Project Plan

Refine and Complete Sections 2-7

Scientific Merit Review

Submit the completed form to Capstone Mentor

3 months
Fall 2022 Milestone 3: IRB Approval

8-10 page ethics paper

3 months
Winter 2023

 

Milestone 4: Data collection/Literature review

Final submission

Doctoral Projected Plan accepted and approved

3 months
5.6 Action Research Feedback Loop and Dissemination Plan

Describe the plan for providing feedback to stakeholders and the dissemination of the  Capstone Project findings.

 

This section should include:

        The specific type of meeting (focus group, board meeting, community meeting, presentation meeting, etc.).

        The specific audience (executive administrators, directors, board members, stakeholders, etc.).

        The type of information that will be disseminated (written executive summary, verbal presentation of results, etc.).

        The key messages based on stakeholder feedback.

        The timeline for the feedback.

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.7 Action That Will Result from This Project

Describe the action sought by the project and how the action plan will be implemented.

 

For example, the development of a task force that will be implemented by the organization with community members.

 

 

 

 

 

Section 6. Ethics
6.1 Ethical Considerations

Describe any ethical considerations given the sample and/or topic.

 

This section should include:

        An explanation of how you plan to protect participants during recruitment, data collection, and data analysis.

        A description of any ethical concerns related to researcher positionality and how the concerns will be addressed.

        A description of any possible coercion and how it will be avoided.

 

 
6.2 Risk Assessment

Describe any risk to the participants and/or the organization. Reference the CITIT course for more information about minimal risk studies.

 

This section should include:

        A statement of whether the study is more than minimal risk.

        A statement of whether the study collects data from a vulnerable population.

        A description of any special steps will be taken to protect participants.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Section 7. References

 

 

List all references used in proper APA Style. You should include a minimum of 30 for the research plan but will need at least 50 for the  Final Capstone Project.

 

 

 

 

 

First DPP Review
 

Approved

Deferred

Not Ready For Review

Reviewer Name:

Reviewer signature:

Date:

 

Second DPP Review
   Approved

Deferred

Not Ready For Review

Reviewer Name:

Reviewer signature:

Date:

 

Third DPP Review
 

Approved

 

Deferred

 

Reviewer Name:

 

Reviewer signature:

 

Date:

 

 

 

APPENDIX A

 

SAMPLE QUANTITATIVE MEASURES CHART

 

Variable Type Variable Name Survey/Questions/

Calculations

(see attached survey)

Variable Level of Measure-ment Instrument Name Reliability Estimates
Demo-

graphics

Gender Q#1 Nominal   N/A
  Age Q#2 Interval   N/A
  Ethnicity Q#3 Nominal   N/A
  Type of neighborhood Q#4 Nominal   N/A
Independent Variables Cultural competence Q# 5 through Q# 19

All items on the scale will be summed together

1= Totally unprepared

2= Somewhat unprepared

3= Prepared but need practice

4= Ready to practice

5= Competent

 

*The total number of questions in the cultural competency scale is 14.  The range for the scale equals 14 to 70.

The higher the number, the higher the level of cultural competency.

 

Ordinal Attitude, Skills, Knowledge (ASK) Cronbach’s alpha in other studies ranged between .91-.95 for social work practitioners

 

 

APPENDIX B

 

SAMPLE QUALITATIVE DATA CHART

 

Data Source Specific Data Source Constructs of Interest Specific Interview Question
Archival Documents Agency Background Information

Service statistics including numbers served, types of services provided, client demographics; diagnostic profiles (frequency and distribution); agency budgets, funding sources, the board of directors composition; staff data including licenses represented, years of service, length of employment, attrition rates, gender, racial and ethnic composition.

 

Attitude toward gay men and women and gay affirmative practice. N/A
Researcher Observation For the purposes of this case study, research observation will include participant as an observer (researcher spends an extended amount of time in the setting but does not play an actual role) and observer as a participant (researcher interacts, interviews, and questions people within the setting) as the observational approaches. Field notes will document the content of these observations and experiences within the setting and will provide a primary source of reflective data for the case study. Field notes must be detailed and descriptive, containing both the observed data and the researcher’s responses, feelings, and impressions of the setting (Patton, 2002).

 

Attitude toward gay men and women and gay affirmative practice. N/A
Individual Interviews Agency personnel Attitude toward gay men and women and gay affirmative practice. Can you describe the overall attitude of the agency toward discussing gay and lesbian issues? (see attached interview)
Program Statements/Website Review/Media Review Agency mission statements, agency values/vision statements, diversity statements, client handbooks, brochures, web sites, Facebook, and other social media sites, newspaper clippings, video representations, electronic communications.

 

Attitude toward gay men and women and gay affirmative practice.  

 

 

APPENDIX C

 

SAMPLE TIMELINE CHART

 

Quarter Activity Estimated time frame
Q1 2017 Recruit agency supervisors Weeks 1-4
Q1 2017 Conduct face to face interviews with agency supervisors Weeks 1-10

 

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